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APRIL – AUTISM AWARENESS MONTH

 
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As we have a number of students at Moggill State School that have an ASD diagnosis, it's important that as a community, we are aware of and have an understanding of what it means to have autism.

Did you know that 1 in 100 Australians are now diagnosed with Autism? This means that the chances are high that you or someone in your family knows a person with autism. This April we are spreading the word about ASD to help increase awareness about this common developmental condition.  

The following information is from Autism Awareness Australia.

Autism spectrum disorder, commonly known as ASD, affects how people communicate and interact with others. It affects how they make sense of the world. 

Autism is a developmental condition that is typically life-long. People with ASD experience difficulties with communication, social interaction and restricted/repetitive interests and behaviours. These are often accompanied by sensory issues, such an oversensitivity or under sensitivity to sounds, smells or touch. All of these difficulties may lead to behavioural challenges in some individuals. 

The term "spectrum" is used to emphasise that autism presents differently in every single person. People with autism have a wide range of challenges as well as abilities. 

From 1994-2013, Autism was divided into three diagnoses: Autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder and pervasive development disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). Now there is a single 'umbrella' diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), with three severity categories (level 1, level 2 and level 3, in increasing order of severity). 

Whilst some children are diagnosed by the age of 2, sometimes symptoms of autism can be subtle and, especially with level 1 ASD, these may not become obvious until a child starts school or moves into adulthood. 

While there are some shared characteristics, it's important to remember and respect that autism presents differently in different people. 

Autism is not a physical disability so people on the spectrum look no different to their peers.  This can make it difficult for some people to understand why an autistic person might be behaving or reacting in a particular way. 

Many people on the autism spectrum are able to live completely independently, others need support in almost all aspects of their daily life. 

Let's all aim to see each person with autism for the person they are, and not for what we think their diagnosis means. 

Moggill State School staff are committed to building tolerance and acceptance of every student across the school and wider school community. We as a school, aim to promote an understanding of disability issues and fully advocate for the dignity, rights and well-being of our students with disabilities. We are proud to be a fully inclusive school, with the full integration of students with disabilities ensuring students' with a disability have full access to every aspect of school, social, academic and cultural life.

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Last reviewed 24 March 2020
Last updated 24 March 2020